Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet

Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet

By
Space Daily

 LEFT: L indicates the atmospheric river's low-pressure trough and H indicates the blocking high-pressure ridge further downstream, directing moisture transport (red arrows) into the Dronning Maud Land and the Princess Elisabeth base (white square). The colours show total moisture amounts (in centimetres equivalent of water). Image courtesy Irina Gorodetskaya.

Extreme weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers were behind intense snowstorms recorded in 2009 and 2011 in East Antarctica. The resulting snow accumulation partly offset recent ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, report researchers from KU Leuven.

Atmospheric rivers are long, narrow water vapour plumes stretching thousands of kilometres across the sky over vast ocean areas. They are capable of rapidly transporting large amounts of moisture around the globe and can cause devastating precipitation when they hit coastal areas.

Although atmospheric rivers are notorious for their flood-inducing impact in Europe and the Americas, their importance for Earth's polar climate - and for global sea levels - is only now coming to light.

In this study, an international team of researchers led by Irina Gorodetskaya of KU Leuven's Regional Climate Studies research group used a combination of advanced modelling techniques and data collected at Belgium's Princess Elisabeth polar research station in East Antarctica's Dronning Maud Land to produce the first ever in-depth look at how atmospheric rivers affect precipitation in Antarctica.

The researchers studied two particular instances of heavy snowfall in the East Antarctic region in detail, one in May 2009 and another in February 2011, and found that both were caused by atmospheric rivers slamming into the East Antarctic coast.

Read more
Click for more

Latest Tweets

"The iceberg is enormous — one of the most massive ever seen from Antarctica. Its volume is twice that of Lake Erie… https://t.co/5hMS0e0mn0
RT : Important and thorough work published . Great community effort! Intercomparison of snow depth retrievals ov… https://t.co/QzOCppEPGf
GIS Day at KU -promoting awareness and understanding of Geographic Information Systems- is Weds, Nov 15! Learn more: https://t.co/zscuXIO1eu

Events

No upcoming events